My Sales Copywriting Secrets Revealed

Strategy of a Sales PageWhat’s the secret of copywriting, you might ask? And is there such thing as a copywriting secret?

Well, yes, there is.  That’s why some people will pay you thousands of dollars just for a well written and well tested sales copy, also called sales page.

In this post I wanted to reveal some of my copywriting secrets.  This will also be a guide for you to know if you’re getting the best deal when you hire you next freelance writer for your sales page. By the way, if you like this post, I want you to know that you can hire me for your sales copy as well.

Why the Need of a Sales Page?

If you are selling any type of digital product, your sales page will be your forever link between you and your potential buyer. It will be there for you 24/7 and do the job for you while you sleep, go about your other businesses and while you take time off the computer.

Your sales page will be the voice that sells your product for you.

That’s why sales pages tend to be expensive. They act as thousands of sales people that never sleep and are able to reach all English speaking potential customers all over the world, 365 days of the year.

Depending on the quality of your sales page, though, you will more or less be able to convert it into sales. It will widely depend on how well written it is, how persuasive and compelling it is, and how the whole thing is delivered.

This requires, work, skills and testing. All of these equal cost to the person ordering the sales page, but when done well it also equals lots of money back to you in the form of hundreds to thousands of sales.

What are the Main Basic Components of a Good Sales Page?

A sales page is not just some good words put together.  It’s a strategy that needs to be followed to a T, while the writer can add some tricks to it when testing the page.

The basic components of a sales page are the following:

A Catchy Headline

Well, as in any written peace, form a newspaper or magazine article, a book to a blog post, the first and foremost component of a good sales page is the headline.

The headline of a sales page needs to be written time and time again until you feel that it’s just right. Don’t make the mistake of sticking with your first idea as it’s often not the best one.

By the way, was the headline of this post compelling to you? You can let me know in your comment down below.

In my upcoming eBook I will show you how you can use bad headlines and create good ones with them.

There are also some good tools that can help you to learn how to create excellent headlines that attract readers and compel them to click.

But no matter what tool you’re using, ultimately, you will have to work your own headline and have a feel for it.

A Strong Opening Paragraph

This is the second most important piece of your sales page.

In the first paragraph you need to tell the reader that they really need what you have and that’s what they’ve been looking for.  Since they wouldn’t have landed on your sales page if they weren’t your market, what you have IS what they’re looking for.

But now that they’re there, that first paragraph needs to be good enough to make them want to read more.

After the headline, your opening paragraph can make or break the deal between you and your potential buyer.

A Statement of the Problem

This is what I like to call the depressing part of a sales page where you are going to state the problems or issues that your potential buyer is having.

This is where you can use your creative writing and to magnify the problem of your potential buyer as if they’d look at microscopic parasites they have on their skin with a microscope.

This is where the copywriter is allowed to magnify any little problem that will be the drive for the sale.

As an ex-actress and a creative writer, I have a lot of fun with this. I’ve done that for years!

The more you’re having fun with this part of a sales page, the more you will touch the sensible emotional cords of your potential buyer.

An Introduction to the Solution

Well, I bet you guessed it!

The solution of this incredibly horrible, life threatening problem is YOUR PRODUCT!  I can assure you that if you buy my product your PAIN will go away.

You see, at the end of day, that’s what your sales page is selling – the removal of painful soar – no matter what that pain may be.  the pain could be lack of traffic, lack of sales, fleas on your cat, hair loss, need for more money, need to learn how to create a blog, etc… they are ALL problems, and pains that need to be relieved and removed.

Few trigger buttons you need to create on a sales page are:

  • Hope for prosperity
  • Hope for health
  • Hope for knowledge
  • Fear of failure
  • Fear of loss

Remember that it’s all 100% based on human emotions. Emotions is the number one top seller of a sales page. Actually, I don’t know what number two is.

An Enumeration of the Benefits

After you’ve mentioned a list of problems that people in need of your “product/solution” may be going through (and you know you will be mentioning at least one problem that any giving reader of your page is experiencing), it’s time to enumerate a list of the benefits that your product will bring to the potential buyer.

Depending on the type of sales page, this list can be more or less lengthy, but it always needs to be focusing on the emotion of the potential buyer.

This is where you can (actually should) insert some testimonials of people having tried your product and are satisfied with it. The more genuine the testimonies the better.

A Knock out Call to Action

The call to action is a very important part of your sales letter. This is where you need to leave no doubt in the mind of the potential buyer that they are making no mistakes in purchasing your product.

This is the time where you let them know that you guarantee their money back if they are not 100% satisfy.

It’s a must that you believe in your product and assure the reader that they will love it. But in the unlikely, remotely, most improbable case that they won’t…, you’ll give them their money back.

What is Involved in the Sales Copywriting Process?

As a client ordering a sales copy you might be thinking that all that is needed is someone to find the right words to to a 2500-3500 letter together.  But if this is what you think, you’d be wrong.  A sales letter involves more than just putting a well written page together.

A good sales page includes the following:

  • Study of the product
  • Study of the market
  • Studying and deciding of the best approach for that type of target market (with your specific product)
  • Research of facts and statistics that can help give more value to the sales letter
  • Editing, editing and more editing
  • Testing, adjusting as needed, and testing again

As you can see, none of the items on that list include the actual writing. This part to the copywriter’s work is not often mentioned and most people don’t know about it at all.

Copy Writing is an Art and a Science

Copy writing goes above and beyond just writing a long convincing page. Even the most prestigious guest blog posts you may be writing for blogs like Problogger or Copyblogger have nothing on an efficient well written sales letter.

A sales letter means choosing the perfect word at the perfect time. A single word can make or break the deal between a sale and a click away from the page.

Having some insight about how people tend to react to certain situations and words, both consciously and subconsciously, really helps to make the difference between an excellent sales letter and a mediocre one.

I hope this post was a helpful guide for you to understand what is involved in a sales letter whether you need to write your own sales page or hire a freelance writer to do it for you.

Any thoughts, comments, questions? Please fire away!

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I hope you enjoyed this post, and will start applying those tips now. Please, let me know what you think and add your thoughts down below in the comments.

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48 Comments

  • LisaTwitter: Lisapatb says:

    Sylviane, I cannot wait to see your new eBook. It is amazing how copywriting can make the difference between a purchase or not. I’ve been trying to improve my product pages on a retail site to make people feel something when they are reading them. Not just a pretty shirt but one that will make them look their best via the features of the product, etc. I sure could use more help in that area though. Glad to hear you are doing an eBook for that purpose.
    I’m glad you point out the testing and adjusting along the way. It feels like we are never done with that one.
    Lisa invites you to read..What If Yours Became The Most Popular Blog Site?My Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Lisa,

      My eBook is more about writing tips (in general) than copywriting skills, but there is a whole headline section to help those who have trouble with headlines.

      I am thinking of writing a whole copywriting tip eBook though as well in the future. But this one I might do it as an Amazon Kindle for a hanful of dollars.

      If you need some pointers for your pages, just let me know and I’ll help you if I can 🙂

  • Godwin Okoduwa says:

    There is also something I have noticed about good sales letters, they are long and are filled with testimonials and back up information. One would naturally think the short ones would do better. The Catchy headline is what gets you in and when you are in , you are hooked. Nice one here, Well done

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Godwin and welcome here!

      The idea that people think that a short sales letter works better than a long one is based on the fact that those people don’t know about sales letters and how it works on the psyche of the reader.

      The reason why long sales letter work better is that once you get the right potential buyer they are going to want to know AS MUCH AS possible and, yes, they are going to read it ALL. Everything!

      So, the longer the sales letter is the more time you’ll have to screw that information in. You will be better able to give them what they are hungry for.

      When you get such reader, that’s when you’re making the sale at the end of your long sales letter.

      Someone not really interested won’t read the page whether it’s long or short.

  • silviu says:

    Hi Sylviane,

    I like the “magnifying the problem” part. This is where you start playing with emotions like an actor or a psychologist.
    The essence of a good sales page seems to lie in the emotions and the magic words that trigger those emotions. You really must be an artist (or have the soul of an artist) to do that.
    By the way, I am not sure I understood the title. It is like you are playing with words: serious-game, work-play.

    Have a wonderful day

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Silviu,

      Well I am an artist, so maybe it helps me to create sales pages.

      Now, I’m not sure why you didn’t get the title. I thought it was clear enough, but unless I know exactly what you mean, I’m not sure what to tell you 🙂

      Thanks for coming by.

      • silviu says:

        Hi Sylviane,

        Let me explain my comment. There are two verbs: “reveal” and “revel”.

        Reveal – unveil some secrets
        revel – enjoy yourself in a lively way

        So there are two meanings:

        a. I will reveal my copywriting secrets
        b. I will talk about my copywriting secrets in an lively and playful way.

        First time I thought you wanted to say : “… secrets revealed” . Then I thought of you. You are an artist and a writer. Maybe you wrote “reveled” on purpose. One single letter changed the meaning of the title.

        • Sylviane Nuccio says:

          Oh, you’re totally correct Silviu.

          I would love to tell you that it was in purpose, but it wasn’t 🙂 simple stupid typo and the worst part is that I kept seeing “revealed” and was shocked to see that I’ve written “reveled.” Oops. I just corrected it. Never meant reveled.

          Thanks for being good like that 🙂

  • Theodore Nwangene says:

    Its been a while Sylviane,
    I really missed all your amazing tips though, it wasn’t intentional, it was just that i have so many things I’m struggling to keep up with but, I’m happy to be here again :).

    To be frank with you, this is one of the best posts I’ve read today. Creating a very successful sales letter is never easy, neither is it a rocket science.

    One of the main things that will guarantee your sales letter success is its HEADLINE and OPENING PARAGRAPH. If these two things suck then, you will not make anything off the product you wrote about QED.

    Seriously, I’ve not written a sales copy before but, anyone that diligently followed this process of yours can indeed do it very well :).

    Thanks for sharing.

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Theodore,

      Don’t worry I know what you mean and at times I can’t get to all the blogs I want to either.

      Well, thank you so much for this complement of yours 🙂 Yeah!!! I love it when am able to create superior content that really makes a difference. We know no one can do that ALL the time, but at times we can pull one off 🙂

      Thank you for coming back and see you at your place later today 🙂

  • Kumar GaurawTwitter: kgauraw says:

    Hi Sylviane,
    A great post indeed. These are some great aspects of sales pages and they work great. However, there are some also school of thoughts which Jeff Walker, Robin Sharma, Brendon Burchard like people follow. They break this process in multiple stages and they value free solutions in parts before they really pitch their sales copy and they mostly do it through videos. I’ve seen that it tends to produce much better results when compared with one lengthy sales letter filled with a lot of problem magnification, testimonials and other information.

    How do these two approaches differ and when one should choose one VS another? May be this is a topic for another blog post?

    Thanks for sharing.

    Regards,
    Kumar
    Kumar Gauraw invites you to read..The Rise Of Smartphones – Amazing Statistics [Infographic]My Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Kumar,

      Yes, great topic, indeed, and I would love to do a post about that!

      It seems that more and more people add videos in their sales copy, and we know videos work. I think it’s a good idea to have both, the video and the written content.

      I can talk ONLY for myself, but I tend to get way more bored watching a chatty video than reading content, but I understand that no everybody feels as I do. I also think that for a good writer it’s better to write a good sales letter and for a good talker it may be best to record a video.

      Thanks for bring this point up 🙂

  • AdrienneTwitter: adriennesmith40 says:

    Hey Sylviane,

    Well you can’t go wrong when you put the word secret in a headline, that I have learned as well. It’s one of those power words that grabs people’s attention.

    Now here’s the deal about writing sales copy. I’ve learned about everything you just shared here but guess what! Some of us just don’t have the ability to put those words into the proper context that will lure people into buying what we want them too.

    I’ve been taught all about which words are power words and will get people’s attention. I’ve been taught about how to open up the first paragraph and really entice them into wanting more. I’ve been taught about including the bullet points and breaking it all down. I’ve been taught all of that but that’s why we hire copywriters. Because knowing it and doing it are two totally different things.

    I believe I’m good with words. I can phrase a sentence so that you’ll understand it easily without much confusion. But I don’t know how to put the right words into copy that will get people to buy from me. That’s why I’m hiring you to write my sales copy because I would spend way too much time working on something that you’re just really really good at doing.

    I really appreciate you sharing your secrets with us though because I’m sure there are a lot of people who have not been taught this “formula”. I wish them well though actually putting it all together so that they have a winning sales page. I just haven’t been able to do it myself.

    See, some of us have more knowledge in other areas and thank goodness this one is yours. 😉

    ~Adrienne
    Adrienne invites you to read..How To Avoid Crappy Content SyndromeMy Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Adrienne,

      I totally understand what you’re talking about, you can read about doing something until the cows come home that doesn’t mean that you’ll be able to do it. And that’s true with anything.

      As I said toward the end of my post, copywriting is an art and as such some people are going to be good at it and some won’t.

      As I always said in our hangout group nobody can be good at everything. As you know, for me it’s technical stuff which I suck at, and I’d rather let you do it 🙂

      Thank you for coming and have a great week ahead.

  • Sherman SmithTwitter: shermanksmith75 says:

    Hey Sylviane,

    This is simply an amazing take on copwriting Sylviane. It’s been a while since I’ve been on your blog, but it looks like I made good timing!

    I like everything you said on creating a sales copy. Especially on the sections on magnifying the problems. This will definitely get them to think about what solutions are out there to fix their problems.

    Probably the one thing that really sticks out are the statistics. Although looking at stats may be a little boring to a lot of people, this is one powerful way to show how big the problem really is, to figure out what really triggers that specific market, and what solutions your market have been look into.

    If you can show if you’re really in tune with your market, this will definitely pique a lot of interest! Thanks for sharing!
    Sherman Smith invites you to read..Why Do People Give Up On Their Home Businesses?My Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Sherman, and welcome back 🙂

      I’m glad you enjoyed this post, because I had fun writing it.

      Study of the market even before the product is created is very important. Study some more about that market before writing the sales page is, indeed a good idea.

      Thanks for your input.

  • Vineet Saxena says:

    Hi Sylviane,
    I understand the importance of a well written sales page in deciding the sales and profits for you. Though I never sold any products of mine, I have read many sales letters and they are truly awesome in attracting and convincing customers about the product.
    Many people roam over the internet looking for the perfect copywriter. I would definitely suggest your name.
    Thanks for sharing this with us.
    Regards,
    Vineet

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Vineet,

      You’re so kind. Thank you for suggesting my name. Yes, some sales letters do the job just right, there’s no doubt about that. At time, the problem is that the sales letter is much better than the product, though 🙂

      Thank you for coming and nice meeting you. I’ll be checking you out very soon.

  • Carol LynnTwitter: carollynnrivera says:

    Hi Sylviane,

    This is a great overview of the elements of a good sales page. It takes some time to put together because you really do want it to be “your voice” and your connection to prospects. It’s tough to do well because you have to strike a good balance between selling and overselling.

    For me, I think the biggest seller is the testimonials. I really like to hear what other people have said, but it has to be more than something generic like “I really liked this service…” I want to know how it’s helped and why it’s great.

    Lots of sales pages tend to be super long but the funny thing is that I usually read every last word. Ultimately, it has to SELL, and it’s hard to do that in one paragraph. The best pages have their call to action every so often so you can click it any time and go to the buying page, or you can keep reading for more info.

    After reading this, everyone should know how to put together a sales page!
    Carol Lynn invites you to read..Social Media Marketing In 30 Minutes A DayMy Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Carolyn,

      Like you, when I’m interested in a product I read every single word of those long sales letters. I read one just very recently. That one had no call to action in the middle what so ever. You had to go all the way to the end. I also like the ones you can buy by mid letter, but usually I will still keep reading. It’s like it’s addictive.

      I understand that this post might not teach anyone how to write a sales page, but it can give the reader an idea of what’s needed. Writing a good sales page is not easy to do.

      Thanks for coming, Carol.

  • Susan Neal says:

    This is a BRILLIANT post, Sylviane – you’ve encapsulated all the crucial features of a great sales page, and I love the way you’ve emphasised that it’s both a science and an art. Getting the right emotional hook is a key factor, I think – for example, knowing whether it’s going to be more effective to focus on the prospect’s potential desire for something, or their need to avoid a problem. That’s where your market research is going to be so important.

    These are excellent tips, and I think you demonstrate very well why it’s worthwhile hiring someone, like you, who really knows what they’re doing!

    Thanks for a great share 🙂

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Sue,

      Certainly appreciate your feedback. I won’t say that I’m the best sales page copy writer out there, but I can put one together that create sales, because I’ve done it.

      Recently, I made some corrections for someone’s sales page and while the corrections seemed obvious to me, it wasn’t for them, so that’s why people do need to either hired someone or get their help if they don’t know what they’re doing.

      Thank you for coming by Sue, and have a great rest of the week.

  • GladysTwitter: coachgladys says:

    Hi Ms. Sylviane
    Great Post with lots of good information. I love how you explained each detail on the skill of copywriting.
    Yes the title of your post is catchy and the first thing I wanted to do is find out the secrets.
    I know from experience that you are a skill copywriter. You created one for my book!

    Great tips for anyone looking to step into that area of writing…
    Have a great week!

    Gladys recently posted…In Times of Trouble What Beliefs Sustain You?
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    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Gladys,

      Thank you for letting me know what you thought of the title. Very few commenters did. I guess they forgot.

      Gosh I had almost forgotten that I wrote that page for you 🙂 Time flies, Gladys 🙂 While writing a sales letter is not easy it’s a lot of fun.

      Thank you for your input.

  • Donna MerrillTwitter: donna_tribe says:

    Hi Sylviane,

    When it comes to a sales page, all that you mentioned above is so important. But copy writing is the most difficult type of writing one can do I think.

    I remember way back before the internet, I was selling my books via a list and snail mail. It was the same principles as above, the pain, the answer to the question, but it needed to be scrunched down into a way people would not throw that letter out.

    Same goes here in the virtual world. Yes, that title has to be a catchy one and by the way the title of this blog was very catchy!

    -Donna
    Donna Merrill invites you to read..Get Rich Quick Is A LieMy Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Donna,

      Yes, the sales letter is one of the hardest pieces to write, because it needs results. There is much less consequences if you don’t write a blog post that well, it’s just a post after all. But a sales page needs to create sales. It needs to bring in thousands of dollars, otherwise your client is going to frown on you, and with good reason.

      Now if my sales letter sales tons and his product is so bad that he’s going to have a lot of returns that’s not my problem 🙂 but that page must create sales.

      I’m glad my title worked. Thanks for letting me know 🙂

  • maxwell iveyTwitter: mistermidway says:

    Hello; Thanks for a well written introduction to the art and science of copy writing. The first time i ever heard that line was in robert james waller’s book slow waltz in cedar bend when he told someone he spent most of his time in college learning the art and science of the long range jump shot. but the phrase is very true about copy writing. its as much training and technique as it is instinct and feel. and I imagine a good copy writer is worth their weight in gold. And I was glad to see how you emphasized that the writing is the last part and a small part of the whole process. Keep up the great work, max
    maxwell ivey invites you to read..Some new and unusual electric go karts from Rides and FunMy Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Max,

      Yes, indeed, a good copy writer is worth his weight in gold. You can say that. Well known copy writers can make a fortune, because their work bring a fortune to their clients.

      A copy letter is an art that is built little by little and tested a lot too. Some pages that you may see online have been tested and retouched several times.

      Thank you for coming Max. Always appreciated.

      • maxwell iveyTwitter: mistermidway says:

        hi sylviane; always a pleasure to get that email saying i have a new post from you. I try my best to write good descriptions of the equipment people list with me. No one ever complains about my work, but i doubt it is up to the quality of a professional copy writer. I think it has more to do with good pictures and or video and quality equipment. I am hoping to improve these skills by following your posts and learning from you. Thanks again and take care, max
        maxwell ivey invites you to read..Some new and unusual electric go karts from Rides and FunMy Profile

        • Sylviane Nuccio says:

          My pleasure, Max.

          I think that’s fantastic that you want to learn, and gosh kowns there are so many great blogs out there you can learn from. I love that. I’m learning so much everyday from other bloggers too 🙂

  • Les Wallack says:

    Hello Sylviane,
    Understanding the art of designing or “creating” a great sales letter does require a true creative writer as you very clearly and obviously are! It takes creative passion and a true, down-deep feeling that one must have. I was a portrait photographer for near a half century and I can at that the majority of my work entailed a lot of deep motion and passion along with professional advice, guidance not to mention the early on learned skills that are honed to a sharp cutting edge over the passing decades. I found a strong parallel between the design of a great sales letter and the building of a great photographer/client relationship from the initial consultation to the final delivery of the finished product. The two most compelling words were obviously secrets and revealed….great post!

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Les, and nice to have you back here.

      I know that you totally understand this as an artist photographer. The reason you understand it so well is that both are artistic skills.

      Since I am an artist as well, I think that it really helps me to create pretty good sales page, even though it’s not my specialty. But it’s something I KNOW I can do well.

      Thanks for your visit and input.

  • William ButlerTwitter: wiarbu says:

    Hi Sylvaine,

    It all comes down to how one decides to present the information.

    I have seen many sales offers have run on for pages and pages. I don;t know if anyone really has the time to read through all the glowing testimonials that try to convince you to purchase a product, go for all the inducements leading up to the call for action.

    I imagine analytical types who don;t want any fluff, and just the straight goods get really perturbed with run ons as described above.

    I know Brendan Burchard, for example, gives bite size pieces and invites you inside for more… in the manner he has been shown… “See you on the other side.”

    Regardless, the content needs to be well written.

    Have a great week!
    Bill
    William Butler invites you to read..Memorial To All Soldiers Of Justice: Lest We ForgetMy Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi William,

      I know you would think that nobody read a whole long sales page, but if you ask around you’d find that that some people do. Escpecially if they are really interested and want to know as much as they can about the product.

      Some people who commented here said they do, and I do.

      It doens’t even mean that all it’s true either, but it does work for some reason.

      Now I like the method of the guy you mention here. I’m sure it works for him too.

      Thank you for coming 🙂

  • Laura Raisanen says:

    Hey Sylviane,

    This is in fact an amazing post and I’m going to bookmark it for further use. Now I know this sounds like how a lot of spam comments start but I actually mean it 🙂

    I’m in the process of creating my first product (it’s going very slowly at the moment though) and I’m already dreading the part where I have to write a sales page. I’ve never actually written one before but I already know I will most likely struggle with it. Like Adrienne said, I can string a sentence together in a way that people understand me but writing in a way that would get people to buy from me is going to be a struggle. Luckily I have a mentor so I’m not totally alone with it. Ideally I want to see if I can learn to become good at it myself but if that just doesn’t happen it’s good to know there are skilful people available for hire 🙂

    Thanks so much for sharing.

    Laura

  • Susan Velez says:

    Hi Sylviane,

    Great tips on copywriting, I know what you mean about the longer vs shorter. I have found that if the copy is too short, I usually don’t buy. It has not given me enough info or pulled me into really wanting or needing the product.

    I tend to hate those sales letters that get into your head and know which buttons to push, they make me buy even if I really don’t need the product. I only hate them because they do their job of getting me to buy.

    If only I had that power when it came to writing my own copy. These tips will definitely help anyone out who is writing their own copy, thanks for sharing.

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Susan and nice seeing you here.

      I’m like you. If I want to buy a product I like a long sales letter. Some people who commented above were saying that those sales letter are too long, but they’re not really. It’s been tested and proven that they do work.

      I’m glad you enjoyed this post 🙂 Thanks for coming.

  • CarolynTwitter: wonderoftech says:

    Wow, Sylviane, this is a very powerful post. Your enthusiasm for the topic really shines through in your words. Your background in acting and creative writing serve you well here.

    But I do believe Adrienne is right. You are revealing your secrets here, which is fantastic, but not everyone has the talent and experience that you do. I believe you have demonstrated brilliantly why you are so good at what you do!

    I am not selling anything, but if/when I do, I would definitely be hiring you for my sales page!

    I especially liked the part about the sales page being about emotion and you didn’t even know about number 2. Sales really is about emotion and you have delivered that emotion here.

    Well done!
    Carolyn invites you to read..APPO: Get Help Organizing Your Photos!My Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Carolyn,

      Thank you so much for the compliments 🙂

      Yes, I know that while I do deliver some of the sales letter’s secrets not everyone is going to be willing and/or able to write one, and at the same time this serves as a good testimony for potential clients 🙂

      I’ve always been good at making up stories, and when I was little my mother never really knew if what came out of my mouth was the truth or a story, so this type of things fit my personality to a T, even though I totally stopped lying as an adults.

      Thanks so much for dropping by 🙂

  • Tim BonnerTwitter: timbo1973 says:

    Hi Sylviane

    Thank you for sharing these secrets with us!

    As others have said, you can be taught to copyright but unfortunately it doesn’t mean you’ll be an instant hit as a copyrighter.

    My background is in music and I guess that makes me an artist but I don’t think I’d make a great copyrighter!

    I’ll be honest with you. I don’t like sales pages to be too long and I take the testimonials with a huge pinch of salt. Half the time I don’t see the point of them being in there.

    I know they’re expected to be there but many of the ones I’ve seen recently online make me cringe they’re so bad.

    That’s just mu opinion though and I’m sure many people do like to see them!
    Tim Bonner invites you to read..Blog Niche: Why Bigger Isn’t Always BetterMy Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Tim,

      You have a point and I totally understand what you mean. At the same time I’ve read sales letters who have even worked on me, even though I totally know what a sales letter is about 🙂

      Now if you’ve read bad reviews that are badly written or don’t make you want to trust the product it means that the sales page was written by an amateur. At least that’s how I see it.

      As far as how long sales pages should be, I do like them long if I’m interested in the product. I read EVERY SINGLE WORD 🙂 and then I read it again before I buy. Now I’ve heard other people do that to 🙂 But obviously, as anything else in this world, I’m sure that some people don’t like those long letters. It seems that product owners want to stick with them though. I guess that for the most part they work.

      Thank for your input, Tim 🙂

  • Mark Ford says:

    Hi Sylviane

    I’m a first time visitor – I’m glad I stopped by.

    I love the trigger buttons you’ve given – Hope for prosperity, health or knowledge plus fear of failure or loss.

    I’m always trying to explain to my web design clients who write their own copy how they need to get their message across (from my own very limited copywriting experience)

    These tips will help me massively.

    Many thanks

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Mark and welcome here.

      Well, that’s nice to hear that this will be helpful to you. If you don’t write sales letters yourself, but have clients who would hire someone, you might be able to send them my way 🙂

      Thanks for coming.

  • Cole WiebeTwitter: ColeWiebe says:

    Hi Sylviane,

    You’re so right; there is a science to it, and great sales copy is truly an art form.

    Did you ever get your hands on the old Cory Rudl course, back in the day? I read that Cory was crafting the original squeeze pages, with the pale yellow panels and big yellow call to action button, for $30,000 a pop.

    – Cole
    Cole Wiebe invites you to read..Writing Sales Copy That Converts :: Part 1 of 2My Profile

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hi Cole,

      No, I’ve never get through that course, but I read many eBooks and tutorials about sales pages few years ago.

      Thanks for coming by and for your feedbacks.

  • AmitiTwitter: AmitiRothstein says:

    Great tips-thanks. I have a question though: Would you consider introducing the problem in the title or not? We will hopefully be rolling out a brand new website and sales page in the next couple of months, so I’ll keep these tips in mind when we create the blueprint.

    • Sylviane Nuccio says:

      Hello there, sorry for the late reply. I don’t think that putting the problem in the title is a good thing to do. The title should be positive ALWAYS. I hope this help.

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